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Columbus, OH 43215
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LET’S GET READY TO READ! Winter Break is here! During this annual retreat from day-to-day activities in the classroom, we still want our young students to keep learning and expanding their reading skills while they are at home.

Columbus City Schools is launching a new #CCSreads campaign to encourage engagement in literacy activities through Winter Break and beyond. Below you will find the Reading Activity Packets that were sent home with your student as well as many different reading games you can download. Have fun and keep the learning going!

Read along with our Celebrity Readers!
Mayor Andrew J. Ginther  Chief of Police Kim Jacobs
 
NBC4's Mike Jackson  10TV's Kristyn Hartman
 
K-2 Winter Break Activity Packet
   
Winter Break Activities for your K-2nd graders to complete at home! Students will practice reading and writing strategies to help prepare them for the Ohio State Reading Assessment.
4-5 Winter Break Activity Packet
    Winter Break Activities for your 4th and 5th graders to complete at home! Students will practice reading and writing strategies to help prepare them for the Ohio State Reading Assessment.
3rd Grade Winter Break Activity Packet
    Winter Break Activities for your 3rd graders to complete at home. Students will practice reading and writing strategies to help prepare them for the Ohio State Reading Assessment.
Grocery Store Tic Tac Toe
 
  Make going to the grocery a learning adventure! Download our Grocery Store Tic Tac Toe board. Choose activities from the board during your next grocery trip. When your child completes three activities in a row, reward him/her with something fun like taking a trip to the library or reading a favorite story
Synonyms & Antonyms
  Shades of Meaning. Students learn to understand the meanings of words based synonyms (words with similar meanings) and antonyms (words with opposite meanings). Download our Shade of Meaning game where players organize groups of vocabulary words based upon their meaning. Words are organized on a color strip based on their similarity in meaning from synonyms at the top to antonyms on the bottom.
Old Maid: Understanding Stories

 

In this game, students will match the genre to its definition. Players take turns selecting cards from each other to see if they can match the genre and its definition without selecting the Old Maid card. The player that ends the game with the Old Maid loses the game.


Context Clue Tic Tac Toe

 

Students are expected to determine the meaning of words as they are used in a text. This activity contains a Tic-Tac-Toe board, cards with a short passage, and an answer key. Each player will need to choose a game piece (pennies, nickels, colored beans, paper clips, safety pins, “X” or “O” written on a small piece of paper). Each player takes a turn choosing a card, reading the passage, and choosing an answer on the back of the card to identify another meaning for the underlined word in the passage. The other player checks the answer key to see if the answer is correct. If the answer is correct, the player puts a game piece on one of the squares on the game board. The first player to get 3 game pieces in a row or diagonally is the winner.


Context Clues: Nonsense Words

 

 

Students are expected to determine the meaning of words as they are used in a text. This activity contains 10 cards. On each card, the player reads the passage that contains an underlined nonsense word (a word that is not real). Players will write down the meaning of the nonsense word and explain what information from the passage helped them choose the meaning.

Main Idea Task Cards

 

Students are expected to demonstrate understanding of a text and identify Main Idea, what the story is about. This activity contains 28 Main Idea cards. Each card contains a short passage, and multiple choice answer options for students to identify the main idea. When playing this activity, the cards are divided amongst all players. Each player takes a turn reading the passage and the answer choices on their card. The other players refer to the answer key to determine if they answer chosen was correct.


Story Element Identification

 

Story Element Sort: Students need to be able to ask and answer questions about the stories they read. This activity will allow your child to demonstrate an understanding of stories. Players will choose a card from the stack, read it and determine the appropriate story element column to place it in (character, setting, problem, solution, plot, or theme). After sorting the cards, students may extend their learning by answering the question cards and writing their response on a notecard or piece of paper.


Persuade, Inform, Entertain!

 

Persuade, Inform, or Entertain Sort: Students need to understand author’s purpose when reading a passage. This activity will allow your child to demonstrate an understanding of an author’s purpose. Players take turns selecting a passage card. The player then reads the passage aloud. They then decide if the author's purpose was to persuade, inform or entertain and place it under the appropriate header card. Continue until all the cards are selected.


Cookies with Family

 

Have your student help you read the recipe as you work your way though, focusing on descriptive words and even challenging them to consider what changes would happen if you doubled the recipe!


Reading Around the World

  Help your child explore all seven continents in the pages of fascinating stories. Hang a map on the wall. Each time you visit the library have your child type in a different continent into the database of children’s books. He might find The Perfect Orange by Frank Arajo (Africa) or The Empty Pot by Demi (Asia). After you read each book, your child can put a sticker on the continent on the map. He’ll learn more about geography, and he’ll also learn to appreciate all kinds of literature.
Closed Captions

  Turn on the closed caption on your TV so that you and your child can read it together. Question your child about what they are reading.
Reading Star of the Day

  Every child loves to hear themselves read. Take out your cell phone and record your child reading a book. Be an enthusiastic listener. After reading ask questions to prompt and support understanding. You may even consider giving your child a larger audience by placing him or her on FB Live! Your child is definitely a shining star.
Alphabet/Word Soup

  Every child loves to hear themselves read. Take out your cell phone and record your child reading a book. Be an enthusiastic listener. After reading ask questions to prompt and support understanding. You may even consider giving your child a larger audience by placing him or her on FB Live! Your child is definitely a shining star.
Labels of Love

  Word recognition and vocabulary are important parts of reading. On a rainy or cold day, get some paper and tape and start labeling everything in your home -- from furniture to small knick-knacks. Reading these labels repeatedly will build your child’s mental word bank. If your family is bilingual, create labels in both languages.
Making Words

  Pick a big word (example: snowflake). Cut up the letters and have your child make smaller words from the letters given. As you make words, point out how changing one letter can make new words. Once you have made all of the words, use the words your child has made to sort for patterns in the letters.
Map it Out

  It’s important to provide your child with a variety of fiction and non-fiction reading. A fun way to do this is to get a map and show them the way from your house to the grocery store or another familiar destination. Have your child write out the directions, street by street, and then read them to you as you walk or drive to the store – like a living GPS!
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