Accessing Zoom meetings from your Chromebook

  • OPTION 1 — ZOOM APP ON YOUR CHROME BOOK 

    As soon as your student log ins in to the Chrome book, the Zoom app has already been downloaded for them and available at the bottom center of their home screen. This will only show up if you login with your student credentials. ALWAYS LOGIN to the chrome book with your student credentials.

    OPTION 2 — JOIN BY BROWSER 

    The recommended option in Option 1. You have an alternate way to login from browser if you are not using a district loaned device.

Six Zoom security tips to stay safe

  • SAFETY TIP #1 — DON’T SHARE PERSONAL INFORMATION 

    You wouldn’t tell a stranger your address or your phone number. This doesn't change when you’re online. It’s best to assume any personal information you share online could get into the wrong hands. Therefore, it’s smarter to not share at all. Remember this rule and you’ll be better off: be careful what you say online.

    SAFETY TIP #2 — DISABLE YOUR MICROPHONE AND VIDEO 

    If it’s not necessary to have your microphone or video on, disable them. Your teacher may even mute you upon arrival. But if not, it’s best practice to disable those settings for your own safety and privacy. If a teacher calls on you and you need to quickly respond, you can easily unmute yourself. 

    How to mute yourself: click Mute at the bottom corner.

    SAFETY TIP #3 — DON’T SHARE THE ZOOM MEETING INFORMATION ONLINE 

    Never never never and, we mean never,  put the zoom meeting information in a public forum. Sharing a zoom meeting’s password on social media or any public arena is akin to giving out extra copies of your house key to strangers. What’s the point of a password if you share it with people who shouldn’t know this information? If you need to share this information with another student, redirect them to your teacher. Do NOT SHARE meeting information with another student.

    SAFETY TIP #4 — BE MINDFUL OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS

    Being in a classroom in your school is very different from being in a classroom virtually. One of the most obvious differences: people can see inside your home. Use a virtual background. You don’t want your parent’s bank account information or confidential, personal information on full display on your video screen. Put away any confidential information lying around.

    Now that you’ve moved your parent’s credit card offscreen, you also want to think about what people can hear online. Be mindful of other people in your house and if your classmates and teachers can hear them. This gives you one more reason to mute yourself. But if you can’t, be sure to find a quiet room or let your family members know you’re in a class and six-inch voices still apply. 

    SAFETY TIP #5 — RESPECT THE SECURITY SET BY YOUR TEACHER

    Being in a classroom in your school is very different from being in a classroom virtually. Yet, one thing that does not change is that you have to respect the rules of the teacher for the classroom.

    • Students are participants. Participants who aren't hosting a meeting cannot take control of the screen, share their screens, or rename themselves.
    • Only the host can invite participants to a meeting; recipients of a forwarded invitation won't have access.
    • And remember Safety Tip #3, do not forward meeting invitation. It is similar to inviting a stranger into your home.
    • By default, when a host removes a participant from the meeting, that person cannot rejoin. So if you were kicked out of the meeting for some reason, respect that and email the teacher after the meeting.
    • By default, participants cannot join a meeting unless the host ushers them in from a virtual waiting room. Wait patiently as the teacher lets you in. This is to ensure your safety.

    SAFETY TIP #6 — REPORT UNSAFE ACTIVITY 

    If you see something, say something. This is especially true with Zoom virtual meetings. If your child’s privacy is compromised, report the suspicious activity. You can call the IT Help Desk at 614-365-8425 or file a vulnerability report or email Zoom’s security team directly. 

    Additionally please do not misuse your participation in class in Zoom meetings. If you are found to be disrupting the Zoom meeting for your classroom or violating the acceptable use policy for the District, depending on the exact behavior, according to the Guide to Student Success, it could be a Level I offense for Disruptive Behavior or Fraud/False Identification or a Level II offense of Insubordination or Unauthorized or inappropriate use of the internet, computers or computer software. The Guide would still apply since the students are using district devices and district resources(Zoom) to commit these acts. Be a responsible digital citizen, and report it if you see inappropriate behavior from your classmates.

Zoom Tips for Teachers

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